Doctrine & Life Dominican Publications Dublin

Doctrine & Life

Author: Dominican Publications Dublin
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Doctrine & Life fosters dialogue between inheritance of Christian faith and the concerns of today's world - religious, political, artistic and economic. It is Catholic and ecumenical in outlook as it analyses current dilemmas and charts developments in church life, including, questions of specific interest to members of religious orders. *Annual Subscription - 10 issues per year*

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In the November Issue Doctrine & Life November 2022 Catholic Women Deacons: The State of the Question Part 1: Learning from Scripture and History Phyllis Zagano demonstrates how women had leadership positions in the Church during apostolic times, focussing on the position of Phoebe. Form liturgical texts, other documents and from inscriptions there is clear e4vidence were ordained as deacons on the same terms as men. Into the Darkness John O’Brien examines what contemplation tells us about the process of becoming a society of compassionate equals. ‘Self-dispossessed believers,’ he argues, ‘become prophetic, open in radical hope, to nothing less than God as God. In this openness, a new spiritual generativity can emerge.’ Cultivating Consciousness Change Johanna Merry shows how inner restlessness can lead a person towards asking existential questions of meaning and purpose. Four case studies lead her to affirm the view that ‘without a collective revolution in the sphere of human consciousness, nothing will change for the better in us, among us, or in the world around us.’ Psychology, Bereavement and the Pastor Ioannis Pantelidis weaves the Kubler-Ross analysis of stages of grief into a comparison between pre-Christian and Christian views of death. While Greek and Roman philosophers sought consolation in the face of loss, Christian thinking focuses on salvation won in Christ, on the presence of God’s grace, and on involvement in the sacraments. Albert Nolan, O.P.: 1934–2022 Ian Linden writes of the South African theologian who died on 17 October. Will COP27 in Sharm El-Sheikh Confront the Current Global Climate Crisis? Seán McDonagh points to the huge gap between aspirations and reality on moving away from fossil fuels affects every developed country, including Ireland, concluding that if we do not stop this year, soon generations of people and other creatures will pay a heavy price. The WCC Document on Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry, 40 Years later Tobias Winright reports on a conference addressing the legacy of the Lima Agreement. An Era of Change or a Change of Era? David Begg compares the thinking of Francis Fukuyama in his most recent work, Liberalism and Its Discontents, with the enthusiasm for neo-liberal economic and political policy-making that followed his earlier work, The End of History and the Last Man. In Cathonomics: How Catholic Tradition Can Create a More Just Economy, he finds a blueprint for overcoming the rampant inequalities poisoning economic and political life. Spaces, Boundaries and Journeys Marion Coy recognizes that boundaries are always a sensitive matter, and that the art and craft of re-structuring requires a sensitive awareness to people’s attachments. She was speaking in St Nathy’s College, Ballaghaderreen, at the launch of The Restructuring of Irish Dioceses, edited by Eugene Duffy.

In the November Issue

Doctrine & Life

November 2022

Catholic Women Deacons: The State of the Question

Part 1: Learning from Scripture and History

Phyllis Zagano demonstrates how women had leadership positions in the Church during apostolic times, focussing on the position of Phoebe. Form liturgical texts, other documents and from inscriptions there is clear e4vidence were ordained as deacons on the same terms as men.

Into the Darkness

John O’Brien examines what contemplation tells us about the process of becoming a society of compassionate equals. ‘Self-dispossessed believers,’ he argues, ‘become prophetic, open in radical hope, to nothing less than God as God. In this openness, a new spiritual generativity can emerge.’

Cultivating Consciousness Change

Johanna Merry shows how inner restlessness can lead a person towards asking existential questions of meaning and purpose. Four case studies lead her to affirm the view that ‘without a collective revolution in the sphere of human consciousness, nothing will change for the better in us, among us, or in the world around us.’

Psychology, Bereavement and the Pastor

Ioannis Pantelidis weaves the Kubler-Ross analysis of stages of grief into a comparison between pre-Christian and Christian views of death. While Greek and Roman philosophers sought consolation in the face of loss, Christian thinking focuses on salvation won in Christ, on the presence of God’s grace, and on involvement in the sacraments.

Albert Nolan, O.P.: 1934–2022

Ian Linden writes of the South African theologian who died on 17 October.

Will COP27 in Sharm El-Sheikh Confront the Current Global Climate Crisis?

Seán McDonagh points to the huge gap between aspirations and reality on moving away from fossil fuels affects every developed country, including Ireland, concluding that if we do not stop this year, soon generations of people and other creatures will pay a heavy price.

The WCC Document on Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry, 40 Years later

Tobias Winright reports on a conference addressing the legacy of the Lima Agreement.

An Era of Change or a Change of Era?

David Begg compares the thinking of Francis Fukuyama in his most recent work, Liberalism and Its Discontents, with the enthusiasm for neo-liberal economic and political policy-making that followed his earlier work, The End of History and the Last Man. In Cathonomics: How Catholic Tradition Can Create a More Just Economy, he finds a blueprint for overcoming the rampant inequalities poisoning economic and political life.

Spaces, Boundaries and Journeys

Marion Coy recognizes that boundaries are always a sensitive matter, and that the art and craft of re-structuring requires a sensitive awareness to people’s attachments. She was speaking in St Nathy’s College, Ballaghaderreen, at the launch of The Restructuring of Irish Dioceses, edited by Eugene Duffy.

In the November Issue

Doctrine & Life

November 2022

Catholic Women Deacons: The State of the Question

Part 1: Learning from Scripture and History

Phyllis Zagano demonstrates how women had leadership positions in the Church during apostolic times, focussing on the position of Phoebe. Form liturgical texts, other documents and from inscriptions there is clear e4vidence were ordained as deacons on the same terms as men.

Into the Darkness

John O’Brien examines what contemplation tells us about the process of becoming a society of compassionate equals. ‘Self-dispossessed believers,’ he argues, ‘become prophetic, open in radical hope, to nothing less than God as God. In this openness, a new spiritual generativity can emerge.’

Cultivating Consciousness Change

Johanna Merry shows how inner restlessness can lead a person towards asking existential questions of meaning and purpose. Four case studies lead her to affirm the view that ‘without a collective revolution in the sphere of human consciousness, nothing will change for the better in us, among us, or in the world around us.’

Psychology, Bereavement and the Pastor

Ioannis Pantelidis weaves the Kubler-Ross analysis of stages of grief into a comparison between pre-Christian and Christian views of death. While Greek and Roman philosophers sought consolation in the face of loss, Christian thinking focuses on salvation won in Christ, on the presence of God’s grace, and on involvement in the sacraments.

Albert Nolan, O.P.: 1934–2022

Ian Linden writes of the South African theologian who died on 17 October.

Will COP27 in Sharm El-Sheikh Confront the Current Global Climate Crisis?

Seán McDonagh points to the huge gap between aspirations and reality on moving away from fossil fuels affects every developed country, including Ireland, concluding that if we do not stop this year, soon generations of people and other creatures will pay a heavy price.

The WCC Document on Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry, 40 Years later

Tobias Winright reports on a conference addressing the legacy of the Lima Agreement.

An Era of Change or a Change of Era?

David Begg compares the thinking of Francis Fukuyama in his most recent work, Liberalism and Its Discontents, with the enthusiasm for neo-liberal economic and political policy-making that followed his earlier work, The End of History and the Last Man. In Cathonomics: How Catholic Tradition Can Create a More Just Economy, he finds a blueprint for overcoming the rampant inequalities poisoning economic and political life.

Spaces, Boundaries and Journeys

Marion Coy recognizes that boundaries are always a sensitive matter, and that the art and craft of re-structuring requires a sensitive awareness to people’s attachments. She was speaking in St Nathy’s College, Ballaghaderreen, at the launch of The Restructuring of Irish Dioceses, edited by Eugene Duffy.

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