Distance Becomes Communion Edited by Geraldine Smyth OP

Distance Becomes Communion

Author: Edited by Geraldine Smyth OP
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In Distance Becomes Communion facets of the biblical vision of Jubilee are viewed through the prism of memory and hope. A Congregation of Dominican Sisters in Ireland hosted their (known about, but only vaguely known) Sisters from five Dominican Congregations in different regions of Australia and the Solomon Islands, New Zealand, and North America.  Dominicans from other Irish foundations in Portugal, South Africa and Latin America were also represented. Binding them together was their common Dominican root in seventeenth to nineteenth century Ireland. This was no mere clan-gathering, but an exercise in prophetic imagination.  The symposium "From Threads to Tapestry: a Dominican Journey in Mission and Hope" was literally theologically and spiritually, a pilgrimage back to the source, but also a voyage out; more exploration than return, liberation of memory as an act of hope. In Distance Becomes Communion, the 'descendants' of the mission diaspora explore the vision that sent their forebears out from post Famine Ireland to the ends of the earth following their people into exile in Australia, New Zealand, Louisiana and South Africa. They tell of the strange otherness these women encountered; the human and physical obstacles they confronted; their undaunted struggle as women to witness to Christ as teachers and preachers in a religious and social climate where women were often regarded as second order creatures. There is also a probing for the significance of historic and scriptural narrative for the Church today and imaginative articualtions of Christian missions as it encounters stark challenges to justice, peace and the integrity of creation in a new millennium.  The contributors are distinguished theologians, teachers and preachers who believe that Christian gospel still holds a liberating secret for people oppressed by violence and injustice, but now within a larger horizon of dialogue, forgiveness, ecological care, and hospitality to the 'Stranger'. Distance becomes communion makes a compelling case for the relationship between tradition and change, for unity in diversity and the necessary dialogue of cultures and religions in and age of globalization. It will prompt the reader to transcend old thought forms towards realizing a possible vision of Christian mission as solidarity beyond frontiers, reconciled identity and ethical praxis of hope.

In Distance Becomes Communion facets of the biblical vision of Jubilee are viewed through the prism of memory and hope. A Congregation of Dominican Sisters in Ireland hosted their (known about, but only vaguely known) Sisters from five Dominican Congregations in different regions of Australia and the Solomon Islands, New Zealand, and North America. 

Dominicans from other Irish foundations in Portugal, South Africa and Latin America were also represented. Binding them together was their common Dominican root in seventeenth to nineteenth century Ireland. This was no mere clan-gathering, but an exercise in prophetic imagination. 

The symposium "From Threads to Tapestry: a Dominican Journey in Mission and Hope" was literally theologically and spiritually, a pilgrimage back to the source, but also a voyage out; more exploration than return, liberation of memory as an act of hope. In Distance Becomes Communion, the 'descendants' of the mission diaspora explore the vision that sent their forebears out from post Famine Ireland to the ends of the earth following their people into exile in Australia, New Zealand, Louisiana and South Africa. They tell of the strange otherness these women encountered; the human and physical obstacles they confronted; their undaunted struggle as women to witness to Christ as teachers and preachers in a religious and social climate where women were often regarded as second order creatures. There is also a probing for the significance of historic and scriptural narrative for the Church today and imaginative articualtions of Christian missions as it encounters stark challenges to justice, peace and the integrity of creation in a new millennium. 

The contributors are distinguished theologians, teachers and preachers who believe that Christian gospel still holds a liberating secret for people oppressed by violence and injustice, but now within a larger horizon of dialogue, forgiveness, ecological care, and hospitality to the 'Stranger'.

Distance becomes communion makes a compelling case for the relationship between tradition and change, for unity in diversity and the necessary dialogue of cultures and religions in and age of globalization. It will prompt the reader to transcend old thought forms towards realizing a possible vision of Christian mission as solidarity beyond frontiers, reconciled identity and ethical praxis of hope.

In Distance Becomes Communion facets of the biblical vision of Jubilee are viewed through the prism of memory and hope. A Congregation of Dominican Sisters in Ireland hosted their (known about, but only vaguely known) Sisters from five Dominican Congregations in different regions of Australia and the Solomon Islands, New Zealand, and North America. 

Dominicans from other Irish foundations in Portugal, South Africa and Latin America were also represented. Binding them together was their common Dominican root in seventeenth to nineteenth century Ireland. This was no mere clan-gathering, but an exercise in prophetic imagination. 

The symposium "From Threads to Tapestry: a Dominican Journey in Mission and Hope" was literally theologically and spiritually, a pilgrimage back to the source, but also a voyage out; more exploration than return, liberation of memory as an act of hope. In Distance Becomes Communion, the 'descendants' of the mission diaspora explore the vision that sent their forebears out from post Famine Ireland to the ends of the earth following their people into exile in Australia, New Zealand, Louisiana and South Africa. They tell of the strange otherness these women encountered; the human and physical obstacles they confronted; their undaunted struggle as women to witness to Christ as teachers and preachers in a religious and social climate where women were often regarded as second order creatures. There is also a probing for the significance of historic and scriptural narrative for the Church today and imaginative articualtions of Christian missions as it encounters stark challenges to justice, peace and the integrity of creation in a new millennium. 

The contributors are distinguished theologians, teachers and preachers who believe that Christian gospel still holds a liberating secret for people oppressed by violence and injustice, but now within a larger horizon of dialogue, forgiveness, ecological care, and hospitality to the 'Stranger'.

Distance becomes communion makes a compelling case for the relationship between tradition and change, for unity in diversity and the necessary dialogue of cultures and religions in and age of globalization. It will prompt the reader to transcend old thought forms towards realizing a possible vision of Christian mission as solidarity beyond frontiers, reconciled identity and ethical praxis of hope.